Panopto UK HE User Group meeting – UWE

Earlier this week I attended the Panopto UK HE User Group meeting hosted by University of West England (UWE) at their new Frenchay business school. The day consisted of some interesting case study presentations and really helpful discussions from both the AV and learning/teaching perspective.

UWE business school
UWE business school

Discussion areas and questions included:

  • Student assignments – UWE presented on work they have been doing to create a workflow on student assessment that ensures GDPR compliance. Antoine Rivoire talked about how Ulster University students have been creating videos on placements and submitting them through Panopto – 72% said the availability of blogs would help them to choose placements. Roberta Bernabei and Matt Hope presented remotely on how they have been using video to improve student digital and presentation skills including editing. Qs – Even though videos are date stamped Panopto does not lock down submission dates and students can still submit after a date. How should institutions deal with this?
Antoine Rivoire from Ulster University shows their One click recording room

Antoine Rivoire from Ulster University shows their One click recording room

  • Students opting out of being captured on video – How can this be managed? Ideas include: sitting in a certain area, capturing audio only, having a flag for students to hold up and pause recording, 24 hour release window, ensuring use of mics to stop recording people’s private conversations.
  • Video rooms – Dealing with the challenge of achieving high quality audio and video in a restricted space and small budget Antoine Rivoire showed how they have set up a one click video recording studio at Ulster University. Freddie Bujko from Oxford University demoed their one button studio which uses green screen and cost around £10,000 to set up.
  • Subtitling and transcription – UWE shared their experiments with Microsoft Translator for creating subtitles on the fly.
Freddie Bujko from Oxford University shows their one button studio

Freddie Bujko from Oxford University shows their one button studio

After lunch there was presentation from Matt Turner from Birmingham University  on their VLE integration and their changes to folder structure. All access to recordings is through Canvas but some recordings are embedded in pages.  Folders are provisioned in bulk at the beginning of each Semester and Panopto is added to VLE course menu.

We then ended the day with a on overview of last year’s Panopto survey and a Panopto update from Pete Gervaise-Jones.

pan.JPG

Panopto upgrades have now  moved to larger numbers 6 (last winter) > 7 (this summer), with decimal points only used for minor updates. As part of their 12 month product roadmap Panopto are working on video content workflows, integration with webinar software like Zoom, and an online recorder.

The next user group meeting is likely to be in Scotland in April next year.

Gromit in the UWE Business school

Gromit in the UWE Business school

Valuable lessons from our visitors

This week we had some visitors to campus to help us with our digital plans.

ABL, ABW and sensemaking

Professor Ale Armellini, Dean of Learning and Teaching at the University of Northampton, came to talk to members of the IT Services team about the recent activities at Northampton. Northampton have consolidated a number of their campuses and moved the vast majority of staff and students to their new Waterside campus. This process has not just about rethinking physical space, it has involved a rethinking of the way they work and teach (‘Waterside ready‘). Academic staff have redesigned their courses using a new Active Blended Learning approach and staff are now working in an Activity-based working way.

Ale talks to the ITS team about developments at Northampton

Ale talks to the ITS team about developments at Northampton

Ale explained that a course follows an ABL methodology if it:​

  • Is taught through student-centred activities to develop knowledge and understanding, independent learning & digital fluency. ​
  • Has a core, collaborative face-to-face component, explicitly linked to learning activity outside the classroom. ​
  • Helps to develop autonomy, Changemaker attributes and employability skills.

The approach offers a new way of looking at dimensions in ‘the blend’ in blended learning. The most important aspects are pre-session exposure to content and sense-making activities.

Ale’s insights were incredibly helpful for our plans for our Catalyst blended learning courses and at the Cultural Heritage Initiative. We spent some time talking about working with Barco and the classroom set up they have at Northampton.

You can see a version of Ale’s slides from last year’s Digifest.

Video, assessment and feedback

Later on in the week Jennie White gave an excellent presentation to our academics on ‘Using video to improve student learning and support assessment and feedback’.

Jennie is a Senior Lecturer and Marketing Programme Coordinator for the BA Marketing, BSc Digital Marketing, MSc Digital Marketing at the University of Chichester. She is a passionate advocate of the use of video to facilitate the learning experience and an award-winning lecturer. She gained 4 awards whilst at Bournemouth University for making an outstanding contribution to student learning, with online seminar delivery, online lectures via video and MP3, interactive discussion boards and research support. Jennie was awarded Lecturer of the Year by the UCSU, 2017, and the Innovation in Teaching award 2018. Jennie shared her experience of using Panopto in teaching and gave some really great tips:

  • Create micro-lectures – bite sized (10 minute) chunks of content
  • Explain the rubric – videos on how you will be assessing
  • Dissertation support – videoing dissertation supervision meetings
  • Flipped classroom – sharing a prerecorded version of the lecture and checking which students have watched it, those that haven’t can’t attend!
  • Pencasts – videoing chalk and talk using paint or other tools, or even just drawing on paper
  • Marking – videoing yourself marking

Our academics were genuinely excited by the session and there are already signs of increased Panopto use.

Jennie presents to our academics. The session was recorded and will be available through Panopto.

Jennie presents to our academics. The session was recorded and will be available through Panopto.

Huge thanks to both our visitors, it is always great to catch up with people just as excited about learning technology as us!

Panopto Conference 2018

Over 300 delegates congregated in Euston earlier this week for this year’s Panopto conference with a theme of ‘Your Video Learning Ecosystem’.

Rachel opens the conference

Rachel  Avery (head of marketing) opens the conference

Panopto has been about since 2007 and now boasts 100 employees in six offices around the world with an audience of over 5 million. During that time UK HE has gone from promoting lecture capture, making it mandatory with opt out status, creating policies to support this, falling under fire during the pension strike last year and creeping towards an opt in system (explored at the recent UK HE user group). There now seems to be a period of rethinking video use in HE and some interesting questions surfacing around slick versus authentic content.

Rhizomes and the complex nature of learning

The opening keynote of the day was delivered by Dave Cormier (forever known as the man who coined the term MOOC). Dave explored the 3 categories of uncertainty in learning (based on the cylefin framework created by Dave Snowden).

Dave Cormier

Dave Cormier presents on active learning

  • SIMPLE – no subject expertise required – you can spend lots of money, the content won’t change
  • COMPLICATED – subject matter expertise needed, this requires a bigger video project
  • COMPLEX – can only work on part of the problem, disposable learning objects, don’t invest too much

Dave went on to explore if complex learning can be videoed using the analogy of rhizomes and rhizomatic learners (and Japanese knot weed!): ‘Rhizomes grow as networks of roots with no explicit center’, how do we let learners be like rhizomes? Educators should be the ecosystem you want to encourage.

Active learning

The follow up active learning session shared case studies outlined on the Panopto spinner (there were some great graphics at this conference!)

7100562B-1A2B-4780-A422-06BE7ABEB7F2

  • Steve Hiron, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Birkbeck, University of London shared their experience of formative assessment in geology when students recorded their descriptions of rocks and uploaded then to a folder in moodle. The case study is outlined in the the Bloomsbury ebook.
  • Steve Collender, Multimedia Coordinator, Diploma Centre, Law Society of Ireland talked about their use of Panopto to host and livestream videos for their MOOCs.
  • William Seagrim, Lecturer, School of Law and Politics, Cardiff University who leads a professional ethics course on a Bar professional training course presented a great scenario based use case. In an attempt to make the course more engaging they employed an actor and filmed a series of scenarios with questionable ethics. William acted the role of a ‘talking head tutor’ and then played out an approach to how the ethical issues could be dealt with. There were also multiple choice questions embedded. You can see an example from the course on YouTube.
  • Katie Barnes, Advanced Pediatric Nurse Practitioner at Alder Hey hospital looked at their use of a non-educational pipeline to deliver training through shared resources

Authenticity vs Facade

Post coffee break there were a series of talks looking at recent evolutions in the video ecosystem. Ines Dawson, PhD student at the University of Oxford and YouTuber (the amazing Draw Curiosity) gave some ideas on how video can make us better teachers. She discussed academics and students’ fear of making mistakes and the need to own these mistakes: perfectionism in academia = fear of failure = procrastination.  Ines also talked about move towards ephemeral video (though Instagram stories) as the younger generation show a preference for authenticity over facade.

This discussion carried on in to the fireside talk between Eric Burns, CEO Panopto and Simon Clark vlogger and video creator. Simon discussed the need to consume a lot to create (he watches up to 10 hours of video a day!) and the move away from the infallible educator or ‘sage on the stage’ to ‘content created by stage’ and a rise in live streaming, through services like Twitch. Twitch is a live streaming video platform and a subsidiary of Amazon. Simon’s advice to potential YouTube vloggers is to be yourself, don’t take the real you out of the picture. Perhaps the element HE can take from this is that ‘the most engaging content is not always the content with the highest production value’.

Fireside talk between Eric Burn and Simon Clark

Fireside talk between Eric Burn and Simon Clark

The morning closed with a look at the top challenges facing those working with Panopto based on the community survey and led by Debra Garretson, Director of Accounts at Panopto. The biggest challenges include:

  • Staff digital literacy – Jennie White, University of Chichester suggested we offer bite size chunks for our academics to try out (micro-lecturers, use video for assessment- get students to assess content themselves, try live marking, create pop up studios etc.)
  • Student digital Literacy – Lucy Atkins, form De Montfort University shared her research and DigiLit work.

In the afternoon there were some great breakout sessions looking at teaching and learning aspects of Panopto and the technical set up. Some take aways for me were:

  • How do you assess the impact of TEL? Some institutions like Newcastle University have been doing a lot of work with their statistics and are including lecture capture in module dashboards. Other institutions (University  of Wolverhampton) shared some interesting insights into how their video is being used (more usage if content is embedded in a page). Imperial College has attempted to assess and share best practice through the Active Learning summer challenge  – it is incredibly difficult to measure what makes good active learning!
  • Accessibility – Can be a real driver for video but also has its challenges e.g. the new accessibility regulations. Tools like Verbit (captioning) are starting to be used more.
  • Distance learning  and partner delivery- At Edinburgh Napier university they may be using Panopto to replace their ‘flying faculty’ for courses in Singapore by using live recordings or narrated slides. They are currently considering how to capture student’s questions by filming the existing cohort. There are also cultural and language issues to consider.
  • Variety of uses – Loughborough university shared some non-academic use cases: external lectures, capture sessions for prospective and pre-arrival students, lecture capture for elite athletes
Mixed media learning model from the University of Wolverhampton

Mixed media learning model from the University of Wolverhampton

The day closed with a presentation from Eric Burns, co-founder and CEO of Panopto that considered some current meaty issues: net neutrality, the unequal web, control of the web by big companies.  He used the “if you are not paying for the product you are the product” idea to advocate for academic freedom and academic integrity. Eric feels these ‘good’ values will be supported by the release of Panopto Pro – a way to share content with those who do not pay for Panopto in a controlled way. Panopto’s heart seems to be in the right place, or maybe that’s the drinks reception wine talking?! What is clear is that the video ecosystem is a continually shifting environment.

Accessibility, VLES and web sites

Last week we had our first cross-institutional meeting looking at the new European Union (EU) Directive on the Accessibility of Websites and Mobile Applications and its implications for the RAU. The regulations came into force for public sector bodies on 23 September 2018 and state that websites or mobile apps must be made ‘perceivable, operable, understandable and robust’.

At there meeting there were staff representatives from marketing, digital, IT, the Catalyst programme, student engagement and disability support.

A little background information:

  • RAU has a very high number of dyslexic students (around 250 dyslexic students, or 20-25% of the student body)
  • There is a main page on the website that deals with this area, internally there are several VLE pages that cover disability support and assistive technology
  • There is a generic email address available – dyslexia.disability@rau.ac.uk 
  • IT support a significant number of accessibility tools including: Read&write, Sensus access, Dragon, mind mapping tools

The group agreed a number of actions and areas for consideration and will be meeting again early next year to share our progress.

Jisc online briefing

We also sent (virtually) a few people along to the Jisc online briefing on New regulations, new risks which took place earlier today. There were 209 attendees so definitely a hot topic area!

jisc

The briefing began with some polls that suggested that on the whole the HE sector is beginning to get ready for the regulation but isn’t there yet. It then went on to explore the main recommendations:

  • To make your VLE and website perceivable, operable, understandable and robust
  • To publish a model accessibility statement on your website that details what content is not accessible and the alternatives provided (a model is provided). It should give a single point of contact for problems.

There will be future work to create a Further/Higher Education (FHE) Digital Accessibility Working Group. Questions on the regulations can be sent to the Accessibility regulations Jisc mail group.

 

UK HE Panopto user group – Birmingham

Earlier today (23rd August 2018) I attended the first UK HE Panopto user group held at the University of Birmingham. The session was recorded and live streamed for those for those who couldn’t make it.

It was great to spend time with people from other institutions, many of whom have been using Panopto for much longer than we have and are also using it in very different ways. It seems like there are two main camps:

  • Institutions that have remote recording – Panopto is set up in lecture rooms with dedicated cameras and captures all lectures, policies varied from opt-out to opt-in
  • Institutions that use manual recording led by the academics – Panopto is used in an adhoc way, possibly for lectures, but also in other ways (for screen casting, how to guides etc. – though this also happens in the remote recording institutions)

Currently RAU reside in camp two, but this could change in the future.

Panel session on policies with Mike Ewen (Hull), Andy Birch (UWE) and Karl Luke (Cardiff)

Panel session on policies with Mike Ewen (Hull), Andy Birch (UWE) and Karl Luke (Cardiff)

It was a fairly informal day led by Matt Turner (TEL Partnership and Development Manager) from the University of Birmingham. Birmingham have been using Panopto since 2013 and are now at the point where they have a well-established code of practice and a timetable integrated quick-start system. As Matt put it:”viewings are finally outstripping recordings” and ” we have almost become a victim of our own success” – earlier this year Birmingham ran out of Panopto credit (due to increased use) and had to buy more. You can take a look at their Higher Education Futures institute (HEFi) Gateway training on Panopto for inspiration.

Programme for the day

Programme for the day

Discussion sessions during the day covered areas including:

  • General challenges – Does lecture capture affect attendance? How do you get academics on board? What about change management? Some of the main advice here was to share case studies from people who use it, spread positive message, try and myth bust, don’t spend too much time on editing – students are tolerant of rough starts and ends.
  • Technical set up – How do you carry out integration with timetabling? What about switches, folder structure, use of Linux? How do you get the Panopto ‘on air’ light working?!
  • Policies and code of practice – What is the process in writing a policy? What should one cover? A far from comprehensive list includes: IP, retention (of videos, data and student assignments), archiving (after programme duration plus one year?) process for recording (including clear indication that you are being recorded), copyright, data use – talk about process and service rather than a brand. Who should be consulted (SU, students, academics, registry?) How do you get a policy through sign-off and on to publication? Have you make sure your technical infrastructure can support the demands of your policy? (e.g can you be certain of the age of content or departmental responsibility for it and delete accordingly?)
  • User experience – Involving students in discussions, getting students to make better use of recorded material. Do they actually want every lecturer recorded? Apparently most only watch around 15 minutes of each 60 minute lecture.
  • Consent – What is the process of collection of consent from students? Some institutions have been using approaches that ensure students and staff are forced to re-accept when accessing the site. How does GDPR fit in?
  • Language – there is general dislike of the term ‘lecture capture’ among academics. For a policy perhaps go with ‘policy for recording educational activities’ or ‘captured content policy’.
We were treated to a demo of Birmingham's new Whiteboard capture pilot by Rob Jones.

We were treated to a demo of Birmingham’s new whiteboard capture pilot from Rob Jones.

In the afternoon Panopto’s Debra Garretson gave an overview of the Panopto survey results and encouraged those institutions that have yet to fill it in to get on it with it! The group then discussed suggestions for future features: separating the video and audio stream to allow editing of audio, improvements to the folder structure, better integration with Canvas…etc.

Debra Garretson sharing use cases

Debra Garretson sharing use cases

At the end of the day Andy Birch (UWE) agreed to set up a Slack site for the group to  compliment the existing Jiscmail list. The next meeting will be in February (date tbc) with an group meet-up planned for the one-day Panopto conference in November.

CDEF3821-7ECD-43DB-B118-88B161BF5AF5

Panopto experimentation

Today we ran a session on Panopto experimentation.

We’ve had Panopto at the RAU for a couple of years now but haven’t been using it in earnest. For those who are unfamiliar with it: Panopto is a video content management system for uploading, managing and sharing video and audio files. It is a centralised, secure place for recorded lectures, flipped classroom videos, campus events, and more. It comes with built-in video analytics, a web-based video editor, automatic encoding to ensure videos play efficiently on any device, and a search engine. At RAU the Panopto authentication runs through Gateway – our moodle Virtual Learning Environment. Every course page has an associated Panopto folder.

panopto

Previously Panopto was introduced to our academics as a lecture capture system. However this lecture capture wasn’t fully supported with training, needed to be led by the academics and  was run solely through laptops – there has been no installation of Panopto cameras in rooms. Needless to say the academics weren’t that keen and so relatively little video has been created apart from on some of our distance learning courses.

Panopto recording

The task now is to convince people that Panopto’s use extends way beyond lecture capture. There are still a few technological hurdles to jump (updates, upgrades and authentication) but once they are jumped the possibilities are endless.

During the experimentation session we started to think about some of the following uses:

  • a video of an assignment brief
  • an ‘introduction to the module’ video
  • an instructional video demonstrating a task
  • a talking head video when you are out on site somewhere
  • a video quiz on site – video an area then ask students to point out hazards – Panopto makes it easy to embed quizzes
  • an Interview video with an expert you know
  • a revision summary
  • a video based assignment
  • using the Panopto mobile app

One of our first real institutional experiments in this area has been created talking head videos of our personal tutors in time for the start of the academic year. The personal tutors introduce themselves and explain how students can contact them. This is going to be a great resource for our new students.

Screen Shot 2018-07-31 at 21.01.55

Today’s session went really well and many of us are keen to start using multimedia more as part of learning and teaching. Watch this space!